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TradeWinds

Industry News List

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Construction Employment Gains Remain Spotty In July As More States Show Year-Over-Year Pickup But Most States Post Decreases From June
Wyoming and California Have Best 12-Month Increases in Employment, While South Dakota and Indiana Have Worst Annual Losses; Kentucky and Florida Have Biggest One-Month Gains, Montana and Ohio Lag

Construction employment continued its spotty improvement in July, as more states posted year-over-year gains but most states posted decreases compared with June, according to an analysis by the Associated General Contractors of America of Labor Department data. Association officials said the steady improvement in employment in many states was welcome news, but cautioned that the industry's recovery was still fragile.

"Today's report shows the fragile and fragmentary nature of the industry's recovery," said Ken Simonson, the association's chief economist. "Construction employment increased in 37 states during the past 12 months—the largest number with gains since early last year—but only two states have surpassed their pre-recession peaks, and barely a third of states added construction jobs between June and July."

Both the widespread annual gains and monthly losses were consistent with national totals for July, Simonson noted. Labor Department data released earlier this month showed construction employment rose 3.0 percent from July 2012 to July 2013, but slipped by 0.1 percent, seasonally adjusted, in the latest month.

The largest year-over-year percentage increase in construction jobs occurred in Wyoming (16.7 percent, 3,500 jobs), followed by Mississippi (12.3 percent, 5,800 jobs) and Hawaii (11.6 percent, 3,400 jobs). Texas added the most jobs over the past 12 months (33,100, 5.7 percent), followed by California (17,800, 3.0 percent) and Florida (15,700, 4.6 percent).

The District of Columbia and 13 states lost construction jobs from July 2012 to July 2013. The steepest declines occurred in Indiana (-6.7 percent, -8,300 jobs) and South Dakota (-6.7 percent, -1,400 jobs). The biggest losses were in Indiana and Ohio (-6,300, -3.5 percent).

Only 18 states added construction employees between June and July on a seasonally adjusted basis, while 30 states and D.C. lost jobs. There was no change in Massachusetts or Texas.

Three states had one-month employment gains of more than 3 percent: Kentucky (3.9 percent, 2,500 jobs), Hawaii (3.5 percent, 1,100 jobs) and Wyoming (3.4 percent, 800 jobs). Florida added the largest number of jobs for the month (3,700, 1.1 percent), followed by Georgia (2,600, 1.8 percent), Pennsylvania (2,600, 1.8 percent), Kentucky and Colorado (2,400, 1.9 percent).

The steepest one-month percentage decline in construction employment occurred in Montana (-4.1 percent, -900 jobs), followed by Idaho (-3.1 percent, -1,000 jobs). The largest drop in employment for the month occurred in California (-7,300, -1.2 percent), followed by Indiana (-3,400, -2.8 percent) and Ohio (-3,100, -1.8 percent).

Association officials said that after years of layoffs and slow demand, many unemployed skilled construction workers had likely either retired or switched industries. They noted that should demand for new construction expand, many firms indicate they are likely to face shortages of available skilled workers.

"While the industry's recovery has been tentative and remains very fragile, any jump in demand would be as challenging for firms as it would be welcome," said Stephen E. Sandherr, the association's chief executive officer. "The biggest question for many firms is whether there will be enough skilled workers available if things heat up."

View the state employment data by rank, by state and by change from peak.

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Researchers Test Simpson Strong-Tie® Strong Frame® Special Moment Frame to Validate Seismic Retrofit Solutions for Soft-Story Buildings

As part of the NEES-Soft project led by Colorado State University, Simpson Strong-Tie and other industry collaborators successfully completed earthquake testing of a Simpson Strong-Tie® Strong Frame® special moment frame seismic retrofit of a four-story building during several days of testing from July 24 to August 5 at the University of California San Diego.

The testing was intended to validate the FEMA P-807 guidelines that address seismic retrofit requirements for weak-story, wood-frame buildings in seismically active regions of the United States. The test set up featured a full-scale, four-story wood-frame building with a soft (weak) first story. Simpson Strong-Tie Strong Frame special moment frames were used to retrofit just the first story of the building (the garage area) to see if a lower-cost alternative could minimize building damage during an earthquake. Using the university’s outdoor shake table, the building was subjected to four earthquakes that ranged in magnitude from approximately 3.5 to 6.5.

“After two small shakes and two significantly larger shakes, the building is damaged, but still structurally safe enough for occupancy,” said John van de Lindt, principal investigator on the test and civil engineering professor at Colorado State University. “Earthquakes are particularly damaging to buildings with open spaces at street level and they are prone to collapse at that structurally weak and soft first level even in moderate earthquakes.”

Last April, the City of San Francisco implemented a mandatory soft-story retrofit ordinance requiring evaluation and retrofit for multi-unit soft-story buildings, which includes the option to retrofit using the FEMA P-807 approach. The Simpson Strong-Tie Strong Frame special moment frame was tested based on a retrofit designed in accordance with FEMA P-807. The special moment frame was the only proprietary solution tested for FEMA P-807 in the NEES-Soft project.

“The building tested is like many multi-family buildings in San Francisco built in the mid 1900s,” explained Steve Pryor, project collaborator and International Director of Building Systems for Simpson Strong-Tie. “If not retrofitted, these buildings pose a serious life-safety risk.”

The Strong Frame special moment Frame has patented Yield-Link™ structural fuse technology that is designed to bear the brunt of lateral forces during a seismic event. It is an ideal retrofit solution because it can be installed in existing buildings. The frame’s structural fuses or “links” can also be easily replaced after a seismic event (rather than the entire frame), which is a significant cost savings for building owners.

After the first test series, the upper stories of the building showed negligible damage, due to the Strong Frame fuses in the ground floor frames absorbing the earthquake energy within the frame and keeping the structural integrity of the beams and columns intact. The structural fuses were not replaced between tests, demonstrating their ability to continue to perform during aftershocks.

“The Strong Frame special moment frame performed exactly as we expected,” said Pryor. “We believe this testing demonstrates to building owners that there’s a practical and cost-effective retrofit solution that not only will meet the City of San Francisco’s ordinance, but will also set precedence for other cities with seismic risk.”

The NEES-Soft project is a five-university, multi-industry collaboration led by Colorado State University’s van de Lindt in conjunction with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Cal-Poly Pomona, Western Michigan University, and Clemson University. Industry partner Simpson Strong-Tie is a major collaborator on the tests. Van de Lindt, the George T. Abell Professor in Infrastructure in the CSU College of Engineering, obtained the $1.24 million grant from the National Science Foundation for the research, with additional support provided by the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory. The testing is being performed on the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation shake table at the NSF shared use facility at the University of California San Diego.

About Simpson Strong-Tie Company Inc.
For more than 55 years, Simpson Strong-Tie has focused on creating structural products that help people build safer and stronger homes and buildings. Considered a leader in structural systems research, testing and innovation, Simpson Strong-Tie works closely with industry professionals to provide code-listed, field-tested products and value-engineered solutions. Its structural products are recognized for helping structures resist high winds, hurricanes and seismic forces. The company’s extensive product offering includes connectors, fasteners, fastening systems, lateral-force resisting systems, anchors and products that repair, protect and strengthen concrete. From product development and testing to training and engineering and field support, Simpson Strong-Tie is committed to helping customers succeed. For more information, visit the company’s website at www.strongtie.com.

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CLARVISTA glass among ‘101 Best Products of the Year’ per Professional Builder
Proprietary coating keeps shower glass looking newer, longer

CLARVISTA® glass, a shower glass product made by PPG Industries (NYSE:PPG), was named one of the “101 Best Products of the Year” by Professional Builder magazine.

Clarvista shower glass is made with a proprietary coating, fused on the glass, that seals the surface and makes it resistant to corrosion caused by heat, humidity, soap and chemicals in household cleaning products. As a result, with regular maintenance, Clarvista glass can maintain its showroom looks longer than competing shower glass products.

Clarvista shower glass is available with conventional clear glass or STARPHIRE® ultra-clear glass by PPG. When combined with Starphire glass, Clarvista glass produces a highly transparent shower glass, making it ideal for upscale homes, resorts and commercial spas.

The “101 Best Products of the Year” are selected by the editors of Professional Builder and Professional Remodeler magazines. Each year, they recognize building products featuring the most innovative new materials, finishes and systems geared toward the residential construction market in 16 product categories. Clarvista glass was selected in the “Kitchen & Bath” category.

To learn more about Clarvista glass or to find a local retailer, visit www.ppgclarvista.com or call 1-888-PPG-GLAS (774-4527).

PPG: Bringing innovation to the surface.™

PPG Industries' vision is to continue to be the world’s leading coatings and specialty products company. Through leadership in innovation, sustainability and color, PPG helps customers in industrial, transportation, consumer products, and construction markets and aftermarkets to enhance more surfaces in more ways than does any other company. Founded in 1883, PPG has global headquarters in Pittsburgh and operates in nearly 70 countries around the world. Sales in 2012 were $15.2 billion. PPG shares are traded on the New York Stock Exchange (symbol:PPG). For more information, visit www.ppg.com.

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Builder Confidence in the 55+ Housing Market Shows Significant Improvement in Second Quarter

Builder confidence in the 55+ housing market for single-family homes showed strong continued improvement in the second quarter of 2013 compared to the same period a year ago, according to the National Association of Home Builders’ (NAHB) latest 55+ Housing Market Index (HMI) released today. The index increased 24 points to a level of 53, which is the highest second-quarter number since the inception of the index in 2008 and the seventh consecutive quarter of year over year improvements.

“Builders and developers for the 55+ housing sector are feeling optimistic as they are seeing more consumers return to the marketplace,” said Robert Karen, chairman of NAHB’s 50+ Housing Council and managing member of the Symphony Development Group. “With existing home prices rising, consumers are able to sell their current homes and make the move toward either purchasing a home or renting an apartment that is designed to more specifically suit their lifestyle.”

There are separate 55+ HMIs for two segments of the 55+ housing market: single-family homes and multifamily condominiums. Each 55+ HMI measures builder sentiment based on a survey that asks if current sales, prospective buyer traffic and anticipated six-month sales for that market are good, fair or poor (high, average or low for traffic). An index number below 50 indicates that more builders view conditions as poor than good.

All of the components of the 55+ single-family HMI showed major growth from a year ago: present sales climbed 24 points to 54, expected sales for the next six months increased 25 points to 60 and traffic of prospective buyers rose 26 points to 48.

The 55+ multifamily condo HMI posted a substantial gain of 24 points to 43, which is the highest second-quarter reading since the inception of the index. All 55+ multifamily condo HMI components increased compared to a year ago as present sales rose 26 points to 44, expected sales for the next six months climbed 26 points to 46 and traffic of prospective buyers rose 19 points to 38.

The 55+ multifamily rental indices also showed strong gains in the second quarter as present production increased 19 points to 50, expected future production rose 20 points to 52, current demand for existing units climbed 20 points to 62 and future demand increased 21 points to 63.

“The 55+ HMI for single-family homes almost doubled from a year ago,” said NAHB Chief Economist David Crowe. “Sentiment in other segments of the 55+ market housing was strong as well. This is consistent with the increase in builder confidence we’ve seen in other NAHB surveys recently. At this point, the main challenge for builders in many parts of the country is finding enough buildable lots in desirable locations and workers with the necessary skill set to respond to the increased demand.”

For more information visit www.nahb.org

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Construction Unemployment Hits 9.1 Percent, Lowest July Mark Since 2008; Employment Slips By 6,000 Since June And Shows Little Change In Four Months
Decline in Unemployment Exceeds Hiring by Contractors in Past Year as Workers Leave Industry; Sector?s Employment Grows by 3 Percent over 12 Months with Residential Gains Outpacing Nonresidential

The unemployment rate for construction workers fell to the lowest July level in five years last month, even though employment has stagnated in the past four months, according to an analysis of new government data by the Associated General Contractors of America. Association officials urged Washington leaders to act on stalled infrastructure funding measures to help jump start construction hiring.

"Although the unemployment rate for experienced construction workers came down to 9.1 percent in July, many of those workers have left the industry for other jobs, school or training programs, or retirement," said Ken Simonson, the association's chief economist. "While the industry has added workers in the past year, employment growth has been negligible recently."

The unemployment rate for workers who last worked in construction declined to 9.1 percent from 12.3 percent in July 2012, not seasonally adjusted, and the number of unemployed construction workers dropped by 227,000 to 767,000. The number of unemployed workers with prior construction experience was the lowest July total since July 2007, while the unemployment rate was the lowest July rate since 2008, Simonson noted.

Construction employment in July totaled 5,793,000, seasonally adjusted, up by 166,000 or 3.0 percent from July 2012 but down by 6,000 from the revised June level. Although both residential and nonresidential contractors have added workers in the past year, employment growth in July occurred only on the residential side.

Residential building and specialty trade contractors added 6,300 employees in July and 92,100 (4.5 percent) over 12 months. Nonresidential building, specialty trade and heavy and civil engineering construction firms lost 11,500 workers in June but added 74,300 (2.1 percent) from a year earlier. Architectural and engineering services employment rose by 2.3 percent over the year, suggesting further modest gains in construction ahead.

"The tilt in hiring toward residential construction and the recent flattening of overall industry employment fit with Thursday's report from the Census Bureau on construction spending through June," Simonson observed. "Those figures showed strong year-over-year growth in residential construction, little change in private nonresidential and worsening declines in public construction. These patterns, along with the slow growth in design industry employment, suggest that contractors will remain cautious about adding workers this year."

Association officials said that declines in public construction activity, in particular, were contributing to the recent pause in construction hiring. They urged elected officials in Washington to set aside the kind of partisan bickering that has caused vital infrastructure investment bills to stall in both the House and the Senate.

"After months of promising growth, construction employment has flattened and is at risk of backsliding," said Stephen E. Sandherr, the association's chief executive officer. "Washington leaders should help get construction hiring back on track by passing key infrastructure funding measures, not sacrifice good jobs in the name of partisan point scoring."

For more information visit www.agc.org

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Slow Down in 2013 Nonresidential Building Activity
Brighter prognosis for industry in 2014

With slower than expected activity in the nonresidential construction sector in the first half of the year, the projections for growth in spending have been scaled back. Led by the hotel and retail project categories, the commercial sector looks largely unchanged, but a noteworthy drop in demand for institutional projects has caused participants in the American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) semi-annual Consensus Construction Forecast , a survey of the nation’s leading construction forecasters, to reduce projections for spending to a 2.3% increase in 2013, with next year’s projections raised to 7.6%.

“A disappointing recovery of the U.S. economy is limiting need for new nonresidential building activity,” said AIA Chief Economist, Kermit Baker, PhD, Hon. AIA. “Optimism for a stronger performance next year is based on the recent increase in domestic energy production, the boost to the general economy from a resurgent housing market, and improving employment figures that should help drive demand in the design and construction sectors.”
 

Market Segment Consensus Growth Forecasts   2013   2014
       
Overall nonresidential   2.30%   7.60%
       
Commercial / industrial   8.50%   11.50%
• Hotels   17.40%   15.00%
• Retail   8.20%   11.70%
• Office buildings   5.80%   9.50%
• Industrial facilities   4.00%   6.30%
       
Institutional   -1.80%   5.60%
• Religious   1.50%   6.00%
• Healthcare facilities   1.40%   7.70%
• Education   -2.50%   4.80%
• Amusement / recreation   -4.10%   6.50%
• Public safety   -4.80%   1.00%

About the AIA Consensus Construction Forecast Panel
The AIA Consensus Construction Forecast Panel is conducted twice a year with the leading nonresidential construction forecasters in the United States including, McGraw Hill Construction, Wells Fargo Securities, IHS-Global Insight, Moody’s economy.com, Reed Business Information, Associated Builders & Contractors and FMI. The purpose of the Consensus Construction Forecast Panel is to project business conditions in the construction industry over the coming 12 to 18 months. The Consensus Construction Forecast Panel has been conducted for 14 years.

About The American Institute of Architects
Founded in 1857, members of the American Institute of Architects consistently work to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through nearly 300 state and local chapters, the AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public well being. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards. The AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders, and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit www.aia.org.

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Architecture Billings Index Stays in Growth Mode
All buildings sectors see increasing demand for design services

The Architecture Billings Index (ABI) remained positive again in June after the first decline in ten months in April. As a leading economic indicator of construction activity, the ABI reflects the approximate nine to twelve month lag time between architecture billings and construction spending. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) reported the June ABI score was 51.6, down from a mark of 52.9 in May. This score reflects an increase in demand for design services (any score above 50 indicates an increase in billings). The new projects inquiry index was 62.6, up sharply from the reading of 59.1 the previous month.

You can see this press release online here: http://www.aia.org/press/releases/AIAB099631

“With steady demand for design work in all major nonresidential building categories, the construction sector seems to be stabilizing,” said AIA Chief Economist, Kermit Baker, PhD, Hon. AIA. “Threats to a sustained recovery include construction costs and labor availability, inability to access financing for real estate projects, and possible adverse effects in the coming months from sequestration and the looming federal debt ceiling debate.”

Key June ABI highlights:

  • Regional averages: Northeast (55.6), South (54.8), West (51.2), Midwest (48.3)

  • Sector index breakdown: commercial / industrial (54.7), multi-family residential (54.0), mixed practice (52.4), institutional (51.8)

  • Project inquiries index: 62.6

The regional and sector categories are calculated as a 3-month moving average, whereas the index and inquiries are monthly numbers.

About the AIA Architecture Billings Index
The Architecture Billings Index (ABI), produced by the AIA Economics & Market Research Group, is a leading economic indicator that provides an approximately nine to twelve month glimpse into the future of nonresidential construction spending activity. The diffusion indexes contained in the full report are derived from a monthly “Work-on-the-Boards” survey that is sent to a panel of AIA member-owned firms. Participants are asked whether their billings increased, decreased, or stayed the same in the month that just ended as compared to the prior month, and the results are then compiled into the ABI. These monthly results are also seasonally adjusted to allow for comparison to prior months. The monthly ABI index scores are centered around 50, with scores above 50 indicating an aggregate increase in billings, and scores below 50 indicating a decline. The regional and sector data are formulated using a three-month moving average. More information on the ABI and the analysis of its relationship to construction activity can be found in the White Paper Architecture Billings as a Leading Indicator of Construction: Analysis of the Relationship Between a Billings Index and Construction Spending on the AIA web site.

About The American Institute of Architects
Founded in 1857, members of the American Institute of Architects consistently work to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through nearly 300 state and local chapters, the AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public well being. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards. The AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders, and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit www.aia.org.

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Garland Roofs Now Feature Factory-Applied Reflective Surfacing

Garland’s highly reflective Sunburst™ mineral surfacing is now available as a factory-applied option on select StressPly® high-performance membranes, for one-step installation of waterproofing protection and reflective surfacing. Factory-applied Sunburst minerals provide a superior reflective surface that dramatically reduces rooftop temperatures, while providing extreme hail, wind and weather protection.

According to Tom Bauer, Garland’s product manager for rolled goods, “The Sunburst mineral surfaced membranes meet California Title 24 product criteria, are Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC)1 listed products, and exceed the SRI requirement set by LEED®2 by nearly 20 percent. That will make an appreciable difference in reducing HVAC cooling costs, while providing the excellent surface durability and extended service life that our StressPly products are known for.”

Sunburst surfacing is offered as an optional upgrade with StressPly Plus FR Mineral and StressPly E FR Mineral membranes, and comes standard on StressPly EUV FR Mineral and StressPly Max FR Mineral. Garland’s StressPly membranes have numerous application options, including hot, cold, self-adhering, and torch.

The Garland Company, Inc. is one of the worldwide leaders of quality, high-performance roofing and building maintenance solutions for the commercial, industrial and institutional markets. For over 100 years, Garland has continually developed unique product and service offerings that have raised the bar of performance while exceeding the individual needs of customers throughout the world. Today, our network of over 200 local building envelope professionals is ideally positioned throughout the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom to provide quality roofing solutions for single and multi-property facilities. The Garland Company Inc., headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio, is an ISO 9001:2008 certified company.

For a free building envelope inspection, or for more information, visit www.garlandco.com, or call toll-free to be connected with your local Garland representative at 1.800.321.9336.

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AIA Selects 12 Projects for National Healthcare Design Awards
Projects showcase the best of healthcare building design and health design-oriented research

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Academy of Architecture for Health (AAH) has selected the recipients of the AIA National Healthcare Design Awards program. The AIA Healthcare Awards program showcases the best of healthcare building design and healthcare design-oriented research. Projects exhibit conceptual strengths that solve aesthetic, civic, urban, and social concerns as well as the requisite functional and sustainability concerns of a hospital.

Jurors for the 2013 National Healthcare Design Awards include: Joan Saba, AIA, Chair, NBBJ; Orlando T. Maione, AIA, Maione Associates; Mike Mense, FAIA, mmenseArchitects; Kathy Reno, Joint Commission Resources, Inc.; Bill Rostenberg, FAIA, Stantec; Bryan Shiles, AIA, WRNS and Ron Smith, AIA, Design At The Intersection.

Recipients were selected in five different categories; Category A: Built, Less than $25 million in construction cost, Category B: Built, More than $25 million in construction cost, Category C: Unbuilt, Category D: Innovations in Planning and Design Research, Built and Unbuilt and Category E: Master Planning Urban Design for Healthcare Settings.

For images please contact Matt Tinder at mtinder@aia.org.

Category A: Built, Less than $25 million in construction cost

UCLA Outpatient Surgery and Oncology Center; Santa Monica, California
Michael W. Folonis Architects

This outpatient surgery, oncology treatment and medical office facility asserts that a more-natural and less-clinical environment promotes healing in patients and productive behavior in medical staff. The architects sought the maximum inclusion of natural lighting and ventilation, and an enhanced indoor-outdoor connection. The design concept is inspired by the belief that principles of Modernism are the ideal means to realize the high standards of sustainability in healthcare design. The design achieves an aesthetic ideal, while delivering a patient-focused healing environment, the utility required by the owner, and the requirements for Gold LEED certification. This is the only project to win AIA-AAH Awards in both on-the-boards and built categories.

Peace Island Medical Center; Friday Harbor, San Juan Island, Washington
Mahlum

Peace Island Medical Center began with a remote island community uniting to realize their vision of rural healthcare in the San Juan Islands. The hospital melds discreetly into the old-growth forest, basalt slopes and wetlands. Island resources are extremely limited, making sustainable choices fundamental. Naturally ventilated clinical areas and patient rooms connect occupants with fresh air and drive down energy use. The design reflects the values of the caregivers and community, embodying humility, environmental sensitivity and innovation. The Living Building Challenge served as a roadmap for sustainable initiatives, decoupled mechanical systems, greatly reduced potable water use and minimal energy use.

Adamsville Regional Health Center; Atlanta
Stanley Beaman & Sears

The 34,000-square-foot building houses a primary care clinic, a behavioral health clinic, childcare facilities, a dental clinic and a workforce community center. The co-location of these functions led the design team to consider the communal folk art of quilting and inspiration also came from the constructed paintings of contemporary Atlanta artist Radcliffe Bailey, who pieces together found objects, archival photographs and historic imagery with jazz-like effects. The design-build, fast-track project was completed, from start to finish, in 275 days. It required coordinating the participation of multiple stakeholders including the City of Atlanta and Fulton County governments, the contracting firm Whiting-Turner, Fulton County Board of Commissioners Vice Chair Emma Darnell, the Fulton County Office of Cultural Affairs, the staff of West End Medical Center and residents of the Adamsville neighborhood.

The Everett Clinic Smokey Point Medical Center; Smokey Point, Washington
ZGF Architects LLP

The new Smokey Point Medical Center houses twenty different medical specialties in a two-story 60,000-square-foot clinic designed to reflect The Everett Clinic’s values and to streamline and enhance the patient experience by reducing wait times and providing comprehensive care in a single easy to access community location. The facility was designed using Lean with a focus on achieving a highly efficient, flexible and patient-focused care environment that expressed affordable elegance. This facility manifests the Everett Clinic’s core values: do what is right for each patient; provide and enriching and supportive care environment; and deliver value in quality, cost and service.

Category B: Build, More than $25 million in construction cost

University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital; Minneapolis, Minnesota
Tsoi/Kobus & Associates

The University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital started with a vision: to create the ideal environment in which to provide and receive children’s healthcare. Today, the hospital is setting new standards for safety, comfort, and clinical efficiency. The six-story building consolidates the pediatric programs and inpatient units. It includes 96 same-handed, private inpatient rooms, a sedation/observation unit, dialysis unit, pediatric emergency department, an expansion of the existing imaging department and surgical suite, family resource center, gift shop, and underground parking. The building creates a distinctive identity for the hospital, immediately engaging visitors with its bright and playful exterior of multi-colored stainless steel panels. An interactive interior design theme, “Passport to Discovery,” enlivens the interior, aids in wayfinding, and offers opportunities for diversion and discovery.

Palomar Medical Center; Escondido, California
CO Architects

Nationally recognized for its innovative approach to sustainable design, healing environments and technical execution, Palomar Medical Center is the first phase of development of a new 35-acre campus that includes the 360-bed acute-care hospital and a new central plant. Innovations in medical planning and architectural design meet the project goals of improving access to care, improving operational efficiencies, and creating sustainable, high-performance healing environments. Design strategies incorporate garden spaces at every level of the 11-story nursing tower, and utilize green-roof technology that extends the landscape and improves views from the patient rooms. The design includes a full complement of water conservation, air quality, and energy-saving measures.

San Antonio Military Medical Center an addition to the Brooke Army Medical Center; Fort Sam Houston, Texas
RTKL Associates, Inc.

The San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC) is the largest inpatient medical center for the U.S. Department of Defense and the agency’s only American Burn Associated-verified burn center. The building, which opened in 2011, adds 102 beds, a rehabilitation clinic, expanded operating room capabilities, a new emergency department and a new patient bed tower. It also includes a parking structure for 5,000 vehicles, and ancillary support and infrastructure. RTKL was commissioned to design the new 760,000 -square-foot, LEED Silver certified building after working on a number of other projects for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in support of their 2005 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) initiative.

Category C: Unbuilt

Sheikh Khalifa Medical City; Abu Dhabi, UAE
Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in a joint venture with ICME & Tilke as ITS

Sheikh Khalifa Medical City (SKMC) is an 838-bed medical complex in the heart of Abu Dhabi. Designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP (SOM) in a joint venture with ICME and Tilke, SKMC contains three hospitals under one roof, combining a General Hospital, tertiary Women’s Hospital, and Pediatric Hospital. This model enhances patient care through specialization while improving efficiency through shared services. Envisioned as a city within a city, the design creates a bustling campus-like environment of distinct character and is based on the notion of patients as guests. The project’s lobbies and public spaces convey a sense of serenity through spaciousness, natural materials and diffused natural light.

Category D: Innovations in Planning and Design Research, Built and Unbuilt

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating
Room (AMIGO); Boston
Payette

In the groundbreaking clinical research facility, Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s AMIGO Suite, an operating room is linked to adjacent imaging suites, enabling the patient to remain static while the machines—including a 33,000-pound MRI—move from one chamber to another in the midst of a surgical procedure. The array of infrastructure necessary to enable this technology was deftly concealed behind walls and above ceilings, which were kept neutral in appearance so as not to compete with critical patient information displays. The kinetic qualities of the suite are captured on the floor, where the arc of the operating table’s rotation and the limits of the magnet’s Gaussian surfaces are vividly rendered in a palette of colors derived from the facility’s cutting-edge equipment.

Rethinking the need for emergency department beds
Lennon Associates

The project was to reduce the number of beds, staff and patient waiting times in a major teaching hospital emergency department while at the same time, increase patient safety and comfort. This study concluded that 60% of emergency department patients did not need to be in a bed, but could be seen in a less intense setting. Building less beds, needs less staff and requires a new physical layout to accommodate the new patient flow. That gave rise to new possibilities of enhanced patient spaces with amenities resembling that of airline first class accommodations. Computer simulations were liberally used to establish the size and staffing required for the new patient flow model. That was further buttressed by physical trials using actual patients.

Kaleida Health, Gates Vascular Institute and UB Clinical Translational Research
Center; Buffalo, New York
Cannon Design

The spirit of collaboration was the driving force uniting Kaleida Health and the University at Buffalo within a single structure, and the building strives to bring several disciplines and its patients, surgeons and researchers, together to exchange knowledge and ignite innovation. The 476,000-square-foot facility achieves this by stacking a translational research building over a clinical vascular institute. The first four floors of this 10-story “vertical campus,” house the Gates Vascular Institute, with the Clinical Translational Research Center occupying the top half of the building. Sandwiched between the two, is a two-level “collaborative core”—the binder that connects doctors and researchers from varying specialties to meet in a variety of dynamic situations to accelerate medical discoveries—moving science from the bench to the bedside.

Category E: Master Planning Urban Design for Healthcare Settings

Focal Point Community Campus; Chicago
HDR Architecture, Inc.

Located in Southwest Chicago, it is one of the most vibrant, yet blighted, neighborhoods in the city. Acting as both an anchor and a change agent, the hospital is envisioned as an urban campus that fosters a relationship between the hospital and its community. The two are intrinsically linked by a “circulatory system” – a band of food and retail markets, fitness centers, etc. that runs along the third floor of the building. This system serves as the interface between the world of healthcare and the world beyond, and it literally brings the two together – a new paradigm in the industry. Furthermore, the building treads lightly on the site. Its ground floor is wrapped with glass and its grounds are replete with wellness gardens, soccer fields, and basketball courts.

About The American Institute of Architects
For over 150 years, members of the American Institute of Architects have worked with each other and their communities to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings and cityscapes. Members adhere to a code of ethics and professional conduct to ensure the highest standards in professional practice. Embracing their responsibility to serve society, AIA members engage civic and government leaders and the public in helping find needed solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit www.aia.org.

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States Split Evenly Between Construction Job Gains And Losses In June; Year-Over-Year Pickup Spreads But Most States Remain Far Below Peak Levels
Nevada and Illinois Lead in Monthly Job Growth While Wyoming and California Top Gainers for the Year; Connecticut and Texas Shed the Most Jobs in June as South Dakota and Indiana Have Worst Annual Losses

Equal numbers of states gained and lost construction jobs in June, highlighting the fragmentary nature of the industry’s recovery, according to an analysis by the Associated General Contractors of America of Labor Department data. Association officials added that, despite the fact most states added jobs year-over-year, construction employment levels are below peak levels for nearly every state.

“Job gains and losses were quite different last month from the patterns in the past several years as some lagging states—notably Nevada—added workers, while former high-flyers such as Texas, had layoffs,” said Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. “On a year-over-year basis, construction employment has increased in more than two-thirds of the states, but nearly all states lag their pre-recession peaks for construction jobs.”

In June, 23 states and the District of Columbia added construction jobs, while 24 states shed them. Nevada had the largest one-month percentage increase (5.0 percent, 2,500 jobs), followed by North Dakota (4.2 percent, 1,300) and Iowa (4.0 percent, 2,600). Illinois added the most jobs in June (5,400, 3.0 percent), followed by Washington (4,100, 2.9 percent), Iowa and Nevada. There was no change in Alaska, New Hampshire and Oklahoma.

Connecticut experienced the sharpest decline in construction employment from May to June (-3.4 percent, -1,900), followed by West Virginia (-3.0 percent, -1,100) and Vermont (-2.9 percent, -400). Texas lost the largest number of jobs between May and June (-8,500, -1.4 percent), followed by Pennsylvania (-3,600, -1.6 percent).

Over the past 12 months, 36 states added construction jobs—the larger number with year-over-year gains since May 2012. Wyoming had the largest 12-month percentage increase (10.4 percent, 2,200 jobs), closely followed by Louisiana (9.7 percent, 12,200) and Arizona (9.7 percent, 11,100). California added the most jobs (32,200, 5.5 percent), followed by Texas (31,400, 5.4 percent), Louisiana and Florida (12,200, 3.6 percent).

Among the 14 states with construction job losses between June 2012 and June 2013, South Dakota lost the highest percentage (-6.2 percent, -1,300), followed by Kentucky (-5.2 percent, -3,500) and Indiana (-5.1 percent, -6,400). Indiana had the largest number of jobs lost, followed by Ohio (-3,900, -2.2 percent), Kentucky and Pennsylvania (-3,500, -1.6 percent).

Two states—Louisiana and North Dakota—set new construction employment records in June, but most remain far below their pre-recession peaks, Simonson added. Despite its strong showing in June, Nevada’s construction employment last month was still 64 percent below the June 2006 peak. Similarly, construction employment in Florida and Arizona last month was 49 percent below the June 2006 record highs, in spite of big one-year gains.

Association officials cautioned that the construction industry remains fragile as private sector demand has cooled recently even as public sector investments in construction remain relatively weak. They urged administration officials to avoid putting in place costly new regulatory measures and urged Congress to act on vital infrastructure legislation like the Water Resources Development Act.

“With current conditions, one misguided regulation and one missed investment opportunity could cost a lot of hard working construction workers their jobs,” said Stephen E. Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer.

View the state employment data by rank, by state and by change from peak.

For more information visit www.agc.org

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Construction Unemployment Falls To 9.8 Percent, Lowest June Level Since 2008 As All Industry Segments Adds Jobs And Hours For The Month And Year
Headcount Increases by 3.4 Percent and Hours Worked Rise by 4.7 Percent over 12 Months; Association Officials Warn Worker Shortages May Spread Soon without Vocational Education and Immigration Reforms

The unemployment rate for construction workers fell below double digits in June for the first time since 2008 as every segment of the industry added employees, according to an analysis of new government data by the Associated General Contractors of America. Association officials said the relatively positive jobs report for the sector highlights the need to address potential shortages of skilled and entry-level workers.

“Construction employment in June was the highest since August 2009,” said Ken Simonson, the association's chief economist. “But employment is still down by one-quarter from the peak more than seven years ago. Many of those laid-off workers have left the industry—whether for employment elsewhere, more education or retirement—and construction companies face a looming worker shortage.”

The unemployment rate for workers who last worked in construction declined to 9.8 percent from 12.8 percent in June 2012, not seasonally adjusted, and the number of unemployed construction workers dropped by 214,000 to 825,000. The latest numbers were the best June figures for each series since 2008, Simonson noted.

Construction employment in June totaled 5,812,000, an increase of 190,000 or 3.4 percent over the past year. Aggregate weekly hours of all new and existing construction employees expanded by an even larger 4.7 percent, as companies put more workers on overtime.

“The number of unemployed workers with construction experience has fallen to low enough levels that firms in a growing number of locations and segments are having trouble finding people with the needed skills,” Simonson commented. “Contractors have filled the gap so far by adding to workers’ hours but this ‘solution’ may be reaching its limit.”

Residential and nonresidential contractors have added workers in nearly equal numbers, Simonson observed. Residential building and specialty trade contractors added 5,200 in June and 90,200 (4.4 percent) over 12 months. Nonresidential building, specialty trade and heavy and civil engineering construction firms grew by 8,400 workers in June and 99,800 (2.8 percent) from a year earlier. In a favorable sign for future construction growth, architectural and engineering services employment rose by 2.6 percent over the year.

Association officials said some of the future worker shortages that will come if the industry continues to add jobs over the coming months might still be averted. They urged education officials to rebuild skills-based, or vocational, educational programs designed to help prepare students for careers in construction and manufacturing. And they urged Congress and the administration to reject the arbitrary caps on construction workers that are currently included in the Senate’s immigration legislation.

“Now that demand for construction is finally picking up, it is vital to ensure that the industry can find enough qualified workers,” said Stephen E. Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer. “There are actions that policy makers should take now before a worker shortage cuts short the industry’s recovery.”

For more information visit www.agc.org

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Builder Confidence Rises Six Points in July
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July 16, 2013 - Builder confidence in the market for newly built, single-family homes rose six points to 57 on the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index (HMI) for July, released today. This is the index’s third consecutive monthly gain and its strongest reading since January of 2006.

“Today’s report is particularly encouraging in that it shows improvement in builder confidence across every region as well as solid gains in current sales conditions, traffic of prospective buyers and sales expectations for the next six months,” noted NAHB Chairman Rick Judson, a home builder from Charlotte, N.C. However, he cautioned that “This positive momentum could be disrupted by threats on the policy side, particularly with regard to the mortgage interest deduction and federal support for the housing finance system.”

“Builders are seeing more motivated buyers coming through their doors as the inventory of existing homes for sale continues to tighten,” noted NAHB Chief Economist David Crowe. “Meanwhile, as the infrastructure that supplies home building returns, some previously skyrocketing building material costs have begun to soften.”

Derived from a monthly survey that NAHB has been conducting for 25 years, the NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index gauges builder perceptions of current single-family home sales and sales expectations for the next six months as “good,” “fair” or “poor.” The survey also asks builders to rate traffic of prospective buyers as “high to very high,” “average” or “low to very low.” Scores from each component are then used to calculate a seasonally adjusted index where any number over 50 indicates that more builders view conditions as good than poor.

All three HMI components posted gains in July. The component gauging current sales conditions rose five points to 60 – its highest level since early 2006. Meanwhile, the component gauging sales expectations in the next six months gained seven points to 67 and the component gauging traffic of prospective buyers rose five points to 45 – marking the strongest readings for each since late 2005.

All four regions also posted gains in their HMI scores’ three-month moving averages. The Northeast showed a four-point gain to 40 while the Midwest reported an eight-point gain to 54, the South posted a five-point gain to 50 and the West measured a three-point gain to 51.

Editor’s Note: The NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index is strictly the product of NAHB Economics, and is not seen or influenced by any outside party prior to being released to the public. HMI tables can be found at nahb.org/hmi. More information on housing statistics is also available at housingeconomics.com.

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Construction Spending Level Climbs Modestly In May As Hot Residential Market And Public Spending Rise Overcome Nonresidential Slide
Association Economist Forecasts Continued Strength in Housing, Downturn in Federal Spending and Uneven Patterns among Private Nonresidential Categories in Second Half of 2013

Total construction spending climbed modestly in May as growth in residential and public construction offset a drop in private nonresidential activity, according to an analysis of new Census Bureau data by the Associated General Contractors of America. Association officials predicted that spending would remain uneven through the second half of 2013.

“Hesitancy by private owners to commit to new construction, along with continuing shrinkage in public budgets, will keep the recovery weaker than it otherwise would be,” said Ken Simonson, the association's chief economist. “On the plus side, both new residential spending and improvements to existing homes will keep some contractors busy. Residential spending appears poised for double-digit growth all year long.”

Construction put in place totaled $875 billion in May, an increase of 0.5 percent from April and 5.4 percent since May 2012, based on Census revisions dating back to 2011. Private residential spending rose 1.2 percent for the month and 23 percent from a year earlier. Private nonresidential spending dropped 1.4 percent in May and 0.9 percent year-over-year. Public construction spending gained 1.8 percent for the month but declined 4.7 percent over 12 months.

“The major private nonresidential segments remain volatile,” Simonson said. “Hotel construction has been the only consistently strong nonresidential category this year. But I expect a gain later in the year in activity related to oil and gas, such as pipelines, petrochemical plants, and fueling facilities for natural gas-powered trucks.”

The biggest jump in construction spending was in new multifamily construction, which soared 2.5 percent for the month and 52 percent year-over-year. New single-family construction rose 0.4 percent and 33 percent, respectively. Residential additions and renovation fell 2.7 percent in May but rose 5.1 percent over 12 months.

The largest private nonresidential category, power construction—which includes oil and gas field and pipeline projects as well as power plants, renewable power and transmission lines—rose 2.1 percent in May but slipped 1.5 percent from May 2012. The second-largest nonresidential segment—manufacturing—plunged 8.1 percent for the month and 3.4 percent from May 2012, although the manufacturing total for the first five months of 2013 combined was 5.4 percent higher than in January-May 2012. The private lodging category, covering hotel construction and renovation, rose 1.6 percent in May and 22 percent over 12 months.

Highway and street construction, the largest public category, increased 0.8 percent in May but fell 7.3 percent from a year earlier, Simonson noted. The next largest public niche, educational construction, edged up 0.4 percent for the month but plunged 11 percent year-over-year, respectively, he added.

“Federal government construction spending appears headed for the steepest decline of any type,” Simonson stated. “Agencies have been cutting back on contracts since 2011 and the pattern seems sure to continue.” Spending on federal projects climbed 0.6 percent for the month but plunged 16 percent from a year earlier and 29 percent from the high point in August 2011, he noted.

For more information visit www.agc.org

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255 Metros Listed as Improving Housing Markets in July
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A total of 255 metropolitan areas across 49 states and the District of Columbia qualified to be listed on the National Association of Home Builders/First American Improving Markets Index (IMI) for July, released today. This is down slightly from the 263 metros that made the list in June, but is more than triple the number of metros that were on it in July of 2012.

The IMI identifies metropolitan areas that have shown improvement from their respective troughs in housing permits, employment and house prices for at least six consecutive months. Six new markets were added to the list and 14 were dropped from it in July. Newcomers include the geographically diverse metros of Cumberland, Md.; Saginaw, Mich.; Farmington and Las Cruces, N.M.; Kingston, N.Y.; and Olympia, Wash.

“This is the sixth straight month in which at least 70 percent of all U.S. metros have qualified for the Improving Markets Index,” observed NAHB Chairman Rick Judson. “The relative stability of the IMI is representative of the broad recovery underway, which is much more extensive than what we were looking at one year ago.”

“Despite slight ups and downs in recent IMI levels, an overwhelming majority of U.S. metros -- including those located in almost every state -- remain solidly on the path to recovery even as the pace of their improvement is slowed by ongoing challenges related to the availability of credit, labor, lots and certain building materials,” added NAHB Chief Economist David Crowe. “Based on recent trends in home prices, housing permits and employment, the outlook for a continued housing expansion remains very positive for the remainder of 2013.”

“The fact that more than two-thirds of all U.S. housing markets continue to be represented on the improving list should be a boon to consumer confidence at a time when many are looking to take advantage of today’s very favorable mortgage rates,” observed Kurt Pfotenhauer, vice chairman of First American Title Insurance Company.

The IMI is designed to track housing markets throughout the country that are showing signs of improving economic health. The index measures three sets of independent monthly data to get a mark on the top Metropolitan Statistical Areas. The three indicators that are analyzed are employment growth from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, house price appreciation from Freddie Mac and single-family housing permit growth from the U.S. Census Bureau. NAHB uses the latest available data from these sources to generate a list of improving markets. A metro area must see improvement in all three measures for at least six consecutive months following those measures’ respective troughs before being included on the improving markets list.

A complete list of all 255 metros currently on the IMI, and separate breakouts of metros newly added to or dropped from the list in July, is available at www.nahb.org/imi.

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PPG Glass eVIEW helps architects, industry pros build, see virtual glass in 3-D
Search, construct, view, compare architectural glasses in range of building settings

PPG Industries (NYSE: PPG) has launched PPG Glass eVIEW, a multifunctional suite of Web-based tools that enables architects, glazing contractors, glass fabricators and other building professionals to search, construct, view and compare virtual glazing configurations in three dimensions to find the best solutions for their building projects.

Located at http://glasseview.ppg.com, PPG Glass eVIEW features proprietary PPG software that enables visitors to construct on-screen, virtual glazing configurations customized to their desired performance and aesthetic specifications. Glazing configurations can then be viewed in a variety of room and outdoor settings and manipulated in three dimensions so visitors can see their color, thickness, light transmittance (transparency), and interior and exterior reflectivity.

PPG Glass eVIEW also enables building professionals to view specified glazing configurations side by side to compare color and performance data such as visible light transmittance (VLT), solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), light-to-solar gain (LSG) ratio and U-value.

Glenn T. Miner, PPG director of construction, flat glass, said PPG Glass eVIEW will help industry professionals save time and money by facilitating more informed decisions. “With this one-of-a-kind tool, architects, glazing contractors, glass fabricators, specifiers and building owners can compare the performance data of the glazing configurations they select and see what they will look like on a building in the earliest phases of a project. That saves time and money, and it enables them to work more effectively and efficiently with clients, too.”

For added functionality, architects and industry professionals can link to an online project gallery featuring completed projects with selected glazings or link to a sample order page. To use PPG Glass eVIEW, visit http://glasseview.ppg.com or www.ppgideascapes.com.

PPG: BRINGING INNOVATION TO THE SURFACE.(TM)

PPG Industries' vision is to continue to be the world’s leading coatings and specialty products company. Through leadership in innovation, sustainability and color, PPG helps customers in industrial, transportation, consumer products, and construction markets and aftermarkets to enhance more surfaces in more ways than does any other company. Founded in 1883, PPG has global headquarters in Pittsburgh and operates in nearly 70 countries around the world. Sales in 2012 were $15.2 billion. PPG shares are traded on the New York Stock Exchange (symbol:PPG). For more information, visit www.ppg.com.

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Architects Endorse “Design-Build” Reform Legislation
AIA Lauds House Small Business Committee Chairman Sam Graves (R-MO) for Introducing “Design-Build Efficiency and Jobs Act of 2013”

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) today endorsed the “Design-Build Efficiency and Jobs Act of 2013” as a major step in reforming the outdated, lengthy and wasteful process the government uses to choose the services of design and construction firms for federal contracts.

“We commend Chairman Graves for recognizing the burdens current federal procurement practices place on the design and construction industry,” said AIA President Mickey Jacob, FAIA. “Rep. Graves’ bill will go a long way toward streamlining the competitive bidding process. It also ensures that the government gets the most for its money by removing impediments that discourage many firms from bidding for federal work.”

“We urge Congress to pass this important reform bill as soon as possible,” Jacob said.

Current rules cost design and construction firms more than $260,000 on median to compete for a federal design build project. That’s because federal contracting officers have been increasing the number of finalists on projects, which forces firms to “bet it all” on a single project or - worse for the government – not bid on federal contracts at all. With more finalists, it actually costs the government more money to review the lengthy proposals, which is doubly inefficient for both the government and the competitors.

The Design-Build Efficiency and Jobs Act helps alleviate this problem in part by restricting the authority of contracting officers to require more than five finalists on a project, among other things.

Design-build reform has been a major legislative priority for the AIA. In May, AIA First Vice President Helene Combs Dreiling, FAIA, testified before the House of Representatives Small Business Committee, calling for reform of the design-build contracting process so that design and architectural firms can bid on federal contracts without fear of bankrupting themselves in the process.

About the American Institute of Architects
For over 150 years, members of the American Institute of Architects have worked with each other and their communities to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings and cityscapes. Members adhere to a code of ethics and professional conduct to ensure the highest standards in professional practice. Embracing their responsibility to serve society, AIA members engage civic and government leaders and the public in helping find needed solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit www.aia.org.

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Positive Trend Continues for Architecture Billings Index
All regions and buildings sectors see increasing demand for design services

The Architecture Billings Index (ABI) saw a jump of more than a full point last month, indicating acceleration in the growth of design activity nationally. As a leading economic indicator of construction activity, the ABI reflects the approximate nine to twelve month lead time between architecture billings and construction spending. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) reported the July ABI score was 52.7, up from a mark of 51.6 in June. This score reflects an increase in demand for design services (any score above 50 indicates an increase in billings). The new projects inquiry index was 66.7, up dramatically from the reading of 62.6 the previous month.

“There continues to be encouraging signs that the design and construction industry continues to improve,” said AIA Chief Economist, Kermit Baker, PhD, Hon. AIA. “But we also hear a wide mix of business conditions all over the country, ranging from outstanding and booming to slowly improving to flat. In fact, plenty of architecture firms are reporting very weak business conditions as well, so it is premature to declare the entire sector has entered an expansion phase.”

Key July ABI highlights:

  • Regional averages: Northeast (54.3), South (54.2), West (51.1), Midwest (50.8)

  • Sector index breakdown: mixed practice (56.9), commercial / industrial (54.2), multi-family residential (53.3), institutional (50.6)

  • Project inquiries index: 66.4

The regional and sector categories are calculated as a 3-month moving average, whereas the index and inquiries are monthly numbers.

About the AIA Architecture Billings Index
The Architecture Billings Index (ABI), produced by the AIA Economics & Market Research Group, is a leading economic indicator that provides an approximately nine to twelve month glimpse into the future of nonresidential construction spending activity. The diffusion indexes contained in the full report are derived from a monthly “Work-on-the-Boards” survey that is sent to a panel of AIA member-owned firms. Participants are asked whether their billings increased, decreased, or stayed the same in the month that just ended as compared to the prior month, and the results are then compiled into the ABI. These monthly results are also seasonally adjusted to allow for comparison to prior months. The monthly ABI index scores are centered around 50, with scores above 50 indicating an aggregate increase in billings, and scores below 50 indicating a decline. The regional and sector data are formulated using a three-month moving average. More information on the ABI and the analysis of its relationship to construction activity can be found in the White Paper Architecture Billings as a Leading Indicator of Construction: Analysis of the Relationship Between a Billings Index and Construction Spending on the AIA web site.

About The American Institute of Architects
Founded in 1857, members of the American Institute of Architects consistently work to create more valuable, healthy, secure, and sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities. Through nearly 300 state and local chapters, the AIA advocates for public policies that promote economic vitality and public well being. Members adhere to a code of ethics and conduct to ensure the highest professional standards. The AIA provides members with tools and resources to assist them in their careers and business as well as engaging civic and government leaders, and the public to find solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world. Visit www.aia.org.

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Goodwill Partnership Recycles More Than 400,000 Pounds from CertainTeed Gypsum Manufacturing Facility in Moundsville, W.Va.

As part of a recycling partnership between CertainTeed's Moundsville, W.Va., gypsum manufacturing facility and Zanesville Welfare Organization and Goodwill Industries Inc. of Zanesville, Ohio, employees at the plant diverted more than 400,000 pounds of waste from landfills last year. While recycling began shortly after the plant opened in 2008, the relationship with Goodwill began in mid-2011. The partnership with Goodwill was the seed that has steadily grown as part of CertainTeed's broader commitment to continuously improving the sustainability of its products and operations.

Through the program, Goodwill Industries collects, sorts and processes recycled materials received from CertainTeed while providing jobs to help individuals in the community improve their quality of life. In the first quarter of 2013, the program collected more than 145,000 pounds of materials from the Moundsville plant, including plastic, shrink wrap, electronics, batteries, brown paper rolls, semi-bulk bags, wood pallets and corrugated cardboard—putting these necessary byproducts of the plant’s operations to good use.

"Through recycling partnerships like this one, we are able to provide meaningful jobs for people with barriers to employment and help partnering businesses reduce their environmental impact," said Jake Chema, vice president of recycling and manufacturing operations for Zanesville Welfare Organization and Goodwill Industries. "We're thrilled that CertainTeed has chosen to partner with us. It's a testament to the company's commitment to both environmental responsibility and to improving the communities where its employees live and work."

The Zanesville Welfare Organization and Goodwill Industries, Inc. has operated its recycling program since 1914.

"As part of our plant's ongoing environmental programs, our team discovered that there were waste materials that weren't being recycled because they were too large or too inconvenient to transport, and we did not have room to hold a full truckload of recyclable material," said Charles Johnson, Moundsville plant manager. "Goodwill Industries was able to accommodate us at a moment's notice if we need to make room with scheduled and non-scheduled pickups, and it's great knowing we're contributing to a program that's helping create jobs in the community."

The recycling program has also inspired the employees at the plant to keep waste reduction and environmental stewardship top-of-mind in every aspect of their jobs.

"Seeing the amount of waste recycled through this partnership also helps us explore new ways to reduce waste," Johnson added. "The recycling bins are a constant visual reminder to continually improve how we do things."

The Moundsville plant manufactures a full range of gypsum drywall, including CertainTeed® Gypsum Board, CertainTeed Type X Gypsum Board and Easi-Lite® Lightweight Gypsum Board. The plant also manufactures M2Tech® Moisture- and Mold-Resistant Gypsum Board, as well as the company’s groundbreaking AirRenew® Indoor Air Quality Gypsum Board products, which safely absorb volatile organic compounds from indoor air.

Offering a broad range of gypsum and finishing products for interior and exterior needs, CertainTeed Gypsum has served the North American building industry for more than 80 years and is a subsidiary of Saint-Gobain, the world's leading producer of gypsum products. This, in combination with the full range of affiliated CertainTeed Corporation building products, provides architects, contractors, builders and dealers one partner to provide service and support for commercial and residential building projects. CertainTeed Gypsum operates 21 gypsum board and finishing plants across North America.

About Zanesville Welfare Organization and Goodwill Industries, Inc.
Zanesville Welfare Organization and Goodwill Industries, Inc. is part of the world’s largest nonprofit provider of education, training and career services for people with physical, mental, and emotional disabilities, as well as those with welfare dependency, homelessness, and lack of education or work experience. The organization employs a total of 347 associates, with 104 associates having major barriers to employment.

The Goodwill Recycling programs have been operating since 1914. These programs presently provide full-time meaningful jobs for 40 Goodwill Associates. The programs also positively impact the environment by keeping the materials recycled out of landfills. During 2012, Goodwill recycled over 14 million pounds of materials such as corrugate, computers, leather, textiles, plastics, paper, ferrous metals and wood.

About CertainTeed
Through the responsible development of innovative and sustainable building products, CertainTeed, headquartered in Valley Forge, Pa., has helped shape the building products industry for more than 100 years. Founded in 1904 as General Roofing Manufacturing Company, the firm's slogan "Quality Made Certain, Satisfaction Guaranteed," quickly inspired the name CertainTeed. Today, CertainTeed® is North America's leading brand of exterior and interior building products, including roofing, siding, fence, decking, railing, trim, insulation, gypsum and ceilings.

A subsidiary of Saint-Gobain, the world's largest building products company, CertainTeed and its affiliates have more than 5,700 employees and more than 60 manufacturing facilities throughout the United States and Canada. Recognized as a 2009 and 2010 ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, CertainTeed earned the 2011 and 2012 ENERGY STAR Sustained Excellence Award, the highest level of recognition for outstanding contributions to protecting the environment through energy efficiency. The group had total sales of approximately $3.3 billion in 2012. www.certainteed.com

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