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  Sacramento County Juvenile Courthouse, Page 50Sacramento County Juvenile Courthouse
CONSTRUCTION ARCHITECT
 
DLR GROUP 
1931 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 
www.dlrgroup.com 

DESIGN ARCHITECT 
DLR GROUP 
100 East Pine Street, #404, Orlando, FL 32801 
www.dlrgroup.com

Location: 
Sacramento, California 
Total Square Feet: 99,458
Construction Period: July 2003 to Feb 20055

CONSTRUCTION TEAM
STRUCTURAL ENGINEER: Buehler & Buehler Associates - 7300 Folsom Blvd., #103, Sacramento, CA 95826
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER: Harry A. Yee & Associates - 4920 Freeport Boulevard, #D, Sacramento, CA 95822
MECHANICAL ENGINEER: Capital Engineering Consultants, Inc. - 7300 Folsom Blvd., #100, Sacramento, CA 95826

The design of the County of Sacramento Juvenile Courthouse, apart of the B.T. Collins Juvenile Justice Center, is a direct response to the highly complex program. The Architecture Design Team, working closely with the users and the Design Oversight Team, arrived at a functional architectural solution, which specifically addressed the following criteria: Operational efficiency; Security; Clarity of access and Circulation separation; Flexibility over time; Expansion capability; and Service. 

This County of Sacramento Juvenile Courthouse is three floors and comprised of two elements: a three-story courts building, and a two-story entrance pavilion. The two upper court floors include four juvenile courtrooms per floor paired in groups of two around court holding areas, chamber/clerk suites, administration and court support functions. Located on the first floor is the juvenile delinquency reception/clerical support, media center, children's waiting area, staff break areas, court security and control, in-custody delivery and transfer/staging area, MIS, building services and the main entrance lobby. 

Development of the architecture proceeded along the dual aims of creating a building, which would not only reflect the dignity and honor appropriate to a courthouse, but also would create a dynamic civic statement sympathetic to the fabric of the existing juvenile campus. 

The strong solid ends and crisp austerity of the elevations call attention to the seriousness of what this building represents and sets it apart from the more superficial aspects of our day-to-day commercial architecture. 

The Design Team worked both” inside-out” and “outside-in” to define the building massing and articulation. The massing is composed of several separate volumes and is a reflection of the functional aspects of the building. The need to design courthouses with heavy emphasis on security measures is unfortunately all too evident in our society today. Courthouses are the arenas within which societal conflicts are resolved and, as such, bring together families and juveniles under stress. The secure zone is designed to protect judges, their immediate staff, clerks and juries from undue contact with the public. This zone originates in the lower level at the secure judicial parking area. A dedicated elevator moves the judiciary up through the various levels to their respective offices on court floors. On the court floors, this zone is located at the rear of courtrooms and is comprised of chambers suites, a jury deliberation room, administrative areas and support rooms for the courtrooms. The Design Team worked both "inside-out" and "outside-in" to define the building massing and articulation. The massing is composed of several separate volumes and is a reflection of the functional aspects of the building. The need to design courthouses with heavy emphasis on security measures is unfortunately all too evident in our society today. Courthouses are the arenas within which societal conflicts are resolved and, as such, bring together families and juveniles under stress. The secure zone is designed to protect judges, 

This area is designed to isolate the records, evidence movement, judges and staff during the day-to-day activities within a secure environment. Additionally this allows the judges to have a higher level of interaction and sharing of functions. It also places the judicial chamber in location, which gives nearly equal travel distances to all courtrooms. Access from the public zone is strictly controlled and monitored. In-custody juveniles will arrive and leave directly from the detention housing via a secured corridor. Dedicated elevators and corridors provide isolated movement of in-custody juveniles within the courthouse. 

MANUFACTURERS/SUPPLIERS 
DIV 07:
Composite Metal Panel: Alucobond; Membrane Roof: Firestone. 
DIV 08: Entrances & Storefronts, Windows: Kawneer. 
DIV 09: Carpet: Lee's, Monterey, Collins & Aikman. 
DIV 14: Elevators: Thyssen Krupp. 
DIV 16: Lighting: Ledalite, Columbia, Luminaire, Kim.

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