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  Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, Page 32Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh
LEED®-NC SILVER PENDING

DESIGN ARCHITECT
KONING EIZENBERG ARCHITECTURE
1454 25th Street, 2nd Floor, Santa Monica, CA 90404
www.kearch.com

EXECUTIVE ARCHITECT
PERKINS EASTMAN
1100 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222
www.perkinseastman.com

Location: 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Total Square Feet: 91,573
Construction Period: Oct 2003 to Nov 2004 

CONSTRUCTION TEAM
STRUCTURAL ENGINEER: Atlantic Engineering Services - 650 Smithfield Street, #1200, Pittsburgh, PA 15222
GENERAL CONTRACTOR & COST ESTIMATOR: Mascaro Construction Co. LP - 1720 Metropolitan Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15233
ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL ENGINEER: Tower Engineering - 115 Evergreen Heights Dr., #400, Pittsburgh, PA 15229
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT: LaQuatra Bonci Associates - 95 South 10th Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203
CIVIL ENGINEER: Gateway Engineering, Inc. - 1011 Alcon Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15220

Imagine a children's museum... A vivid imprint of actively engaged children, a historic post office with dollhouse details, and a storybook-like empty planetarium triggered the imagination of Design Architect Koning Eizenberg and Executive Architect Perkins Eastman, and resulted in an innovative expansion and renovation to create the new Children's Museum of Pittsburgh.

The Children's Museum of Pittsburgh expansion and renovation continues a commitment to Pittsburgh's north side neighborhood by adaptively utilizing historic structures in an urban setting. The newly expanded facility, completed November 2004, was designed to offer innovative exhibits and programs for children and families across western Pennsylvania and beyond. The Children's Museum of Pittsburgh is one of the few museums in the country to be housed in three buildings that architecturally span three millenniums: the original Children's Museum formerly housed in the old Allegheny Post Office, a registered Historic Landmark; the former Buhl Planetarium building, a nominated historic structure; and the new connecting structure referred to as the Lantern Building. The Lantern Building establishes a new front door for the museum and joins the two historic structures, and provides much needed additional exhibit space.

In collaboration with environmental artist Ned Kahn, fluttering plexi pixels shade the exterior glass of the new exhibit space addition and highlight the movement of the wind, casting shadows on interior circulation space. The seamless, flexible interior space features a veranda, bookstore, and cafe; three floors of exhibit space; classrooms, conference rooms, and a theater; as well as administrative space. Children can tinker under the hood of a MINI Cooper and pound nails in the Garage Workshop, build a boat and set it sailing on a 53-foot waterway in Waterplay, and stage their own performances, complete with costumes and makeup, in the Theater. Creative interactive art works are located through the facility in exhibit spaces, public areas, and corridors.

The design objective for the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh is to be the first LEED(R)-NC Silver children's museum in the country to include the preservation of two important historic buildings. The sustainable design strategy includes a building systems infrastructure that enables Carnegie Mellon University students to modify and test new environmental measurement and verification controls and solutions using the Museum's installed systems.

Museum exhibits, integrated into the museum's design, also convey the building's sustainability features such as its air intake systems, seasonal daylighting, use of recycled materials, photovoltaic panels, storm water retention mechanisms, and utilization of native plants.

MANUFACTURERS/SUPPLIERS
DIV 05:
Metal Deck: Epic.
DIV 07: Membrane: Firestone; Metal Panels: Centria.
DIV 08: Curtainwall, Entrances & Storefronts: Vistawall; Flapperwall: Extech Exterior Technologies, Inc.
DIV 14: Elevators: Schindler.


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