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  Green Bay Transit Facility, Page 16Green Bay Transit Facility
Architects
Somerville, inc.
2100 Riverside Drive, Green Bay, WI 54301
www.somervilleinc.com

Location:
Green Bay, Wisconsin
Total Square Feet: 109,198
Construction Period: Mar 2000 to Jan 2001

Construction Team
General Contractor: 
IEI General Contractors, Inc. - 1725 Midway Road, De Pere, WI 54115
Structural & Electrical Engineer: Somerville, Inc. - 2100 Riverside Drive, Green Bay, WI 54301
Mechanical Engineer: PSJ Engineering, Inc. - 7665 North Port Washington, Milwaukee, WI 53217

The Green Bay Transit Department project called for a new facility to meet the needs of its “growing pains” yet was required to stay within a tight, limited budget. This included new bus storage and maintenance shop (current conditions called for strategic parking and maneuvering at the end of each day), dispatch and administrative areas, and passenger transfer areas — all under the same roof.

The Green Bay Transit System is run on a unique pulse system where all bus routes transfer at one point, which serves as the hub for the entire service area. This results in periodic surges of bus and pedestrian traffic. Thus, the site of the building and circulation were crucial to the success of the facility. The new location was an abandoned seven-acre parcel within a transitional neighborhood of industrial and older residential properties. Located on a major artery into the downtown area, this site required a design that was sensitive to the residential context and created a new landmark for people entering the city from the north. The property itself provided challenges in terms of its narrowness and the necessary turning radii and circulation paths required by buses. 

The bus area needed to accommodate the indoor storage of 48-plus buses, six maintenance bays, bus wash and lifts, and the safe and efficient flow of the buses and people between all these elements. The bus storage and maintenance areas total 85,000 square feet of the 98,500-square-foot facility. This large expanse of building serves as the backdrop for the public and employee areas. The building’s massing reflects this function, while exterior pilasters and materials breakdown long runs of exterior wall into smaller scale segments. Daylighting and lightly colored interior finishes produce a bright and clean environment for the maintenance staff.

The administrative portion called for various private offices with a commission room that would be open to public gatherings during off-hours. The passenger transfer and waiting area needed to allow for the safe and easy transfer of buses for the riding public. Both areas create a lower mass at the facility’s public face with a sloping metal roof and oversized windows for a more human scale.

At the heart of the project stands a 300-foot long canopy with a 14-foot vertical clearance for bus traffic and a width sufficient for protecting the passengers from sun and rain. The concrete island has a smooth saw-tooth form for buses to enter and exit without backing up. The access to this platform is centralized at one crosswalk, which minimizes all cross traffic between passengers and buses. It is this intricate steel structure that serves as a new landmark for the City of Green Bay.

The exterior cladding of the building was chosen to relate to the building’s surroundings, and a play of alignments and materials creates a friendly character. The selective use of economical materials and building systems resulted in a successful project that met all owner needs, including budget.

Manufacturers/Suppliers
DIV 07: Metal Wall Panels: MBCI.
DIV 08: Aluminum Storefronts, Entrances: Kawneer; Translucent Curtainwall: Major Industries, Inc.; Automatic Door Openers: Stanley; Sectional Overhead Doors: Thermacore by Overhead Doors.
DIV 09: Carpet: Interface, J & J, Lee’s; Epoxy Floor Coating: Torginol, Inc
 


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