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  Southlake Church & Christian Academy, Page 27Southlake Church & Christian Academy
Architect
Stephens, Aylward & Associates
223 East Boulevard, #1, Charlotte, NC 28203
www.saa-architecture.com


Location: 
Huntersville, North Carolina
Total Square Feet: 32,626
Construction Period: Sep 2000 to July 20010

Construction Team
General Contractor: James Calmes & Son - N2193 Bodde Road, Kaukauna, WI 54130
Structural Engineer: Miller Wagner Coenen McMahon - 1445 McMahon Drive, Green Bay, WI 54956
Electrical & Mechanical Engineer: Somerville, Inc. - 2100 Riverside Drive, Green Bay, WI 54301
Mechanical Contractor: August Winter & Sons, Inc. - 2323 N. Roemer Road, Appleton, WI 54913
Electrical Contractor: Buss Electric, Inc. - W6166 Greenville Drive, Greenville, WI 54942


The SouthLake Church & Christian Academy in Charlotte, N.C., formally dedicated its new facility in September 2000, although the giggles of children and smell of erasers filled classrooms in August. The building is more than a high school during the week and a church on Sunday. Rather, SouthLake is a faith-based community facility for education, worship and membership interaction. 

This all-in-one concept was the challenge Stephens, Aylward & Associates (SAA) accepted when they were selected as the architect for the SouthLake project. The challenge was to create a special community facility in which neither the educators, nor religious leaders or staff would feel as if their space was an afterthought. 

Church and school enrollment grew faster than its resources, so the project was burdened with a heavy focus on cost. SAA's goal was to create a facility that would cost approximately $90 per square foot, in a market where more traditional approaches were producing buildings around $125 per square foot. 

In addition to budget constraints, the design also posed challenges. 

"The multi-purpose room " with its floating maple floors, two basketball courts, adequate clear height to accommodate volleyball, and full locker rooms - clearly serves as a gym during the week, but the space is transformed on Sunday for services and other special events," said Glen Stephens, SAA President and Partner in charge of the company's Carolina operations. 

Lighting in the multi-purpose room posed a real challenge, as the room required traditional floodlights for sporting events, as well as softer flexible lighting for religious ceremonies. SAA utilized a florescent lighting fixture system with multiple bulbs in each head, allowing for three different settings.

Because of tight budgets and daily use of the facility, energy efficiency was crucial. SouthLake experienced significant heating and cooling problems in its original building, so they sought an energy-efficient, state-of-the-art air conditioning and heating system that incorporated heat recovery and staged, multi-unit equipment. 

SAA recognized the necessity of the building envelope to have a true thermal performance with minimum infiltration of both air and water vapor. The solution was utilizing the THERMOMASS' concrete sandwich wall system as part of the tilt-up panels, creating a continuous thermal envelope from the footings, up the walls, over the roof and down the walls to the other footings. 

The facility would be home to a community, so an inviting and appealing architectural concept was necessary, while maintaining a strict budget. SAA also wanted an exterior compatible with the traditional architecture of the surrounding neighborhood and the existing building on the campus. They accomplished the architectural objectives through a unique stone pattern in the rustication, utilizing small strips and adhesive products.

"Schools are under increased pressure to bring their facilities on-line under increasingly stringent time frames with constrained budgets," Stephens said. "The durability, flexibility and long life-cycle costs of insulated tilt-up wall panels allowed us to meet the scheduling, budget, durability, flexibility and security desired for SouthLake. We believe tilt-up construction is the answer for the growing education market."

Manufacturers/Suppliers
DIV 03: Concrete Sandwich Wall System: THERMOMASS®.
DIV 07: EIFS: Dryvit; Flat Roof: Stevens Roofing Systems; Sloped Roof: GAF.
DIV 08: Entrances & Storefronts: Specialite; Door Opening Assemblies: Marshfield DoorSystems; Glazing: HGP; Aluminum Coping & Fascia: Integris Metals; Wood Windows: HURD; Hardware: Schlage.
DIV 09: Tile: Armstrong; Gypsum Board: United States Gypsum; Paint: SIKA, Porter Paint; Acoustical Treatment: United States Gypsum.
 


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